FROM EMMETT TILL TO BREONNA TAYLOR: AMERICA CONTINUES TO SANCTION THE MURDERING OF BLACKS

FROM EMMETT TILL TO BREONNA TAYLOR: AMERICA CONTINUES TO SANCTION THE MURDERING OF BLACKS

MEDIA ADVISORY

“We want Justice for Breonna yet justice was met for her neighbors apartment walls and not her beautiful life.” – Lebron James, NBA star

On the 65th anniversary of the acquittal of the men who murdered 14-year-old Emmett “Bobo” Till, Black America suffered another punch to the gut by a justice system that too seldom provides anything approximating justice when the victim is Black. The officers who killed Breonna Taylor will not be held accountable.

In August of 1955, Till was murdered by a group of men after being falsely accused of flirting with a White woman in Money, Mississippi. As was the custom for many Black children in the north, they would be sent “down south” to spend the summer with relatives. Till never made it back home to Chicago. I was born 37 miles away in the same county, Tallahatchie, that he was kidnapped from and murdered.

The two men tried for his murder, J.W. Milam and Roy Bryant, were found not guilty in the county courthouse of Sumner, Mississippi on September 23, 1955. It had not even been a full month since they murdered Till. The all-white, all-male jury deliberated for 67 minutes before issuing a not guilty verdict. One juror infamously said:

“We wouldn’t have taken so long if we hadn’t stopped to drink pop.”

Fast forward to September 23, 2020 and we are told that no one will be held accountable for killing 26-year-old Breonna Taylor. The officers who shot her were not found to be criminally culpable by a grand jury. One officer, who was fired months ago was charged with a crime that most Americans could not define if they tried to. Former Louisville police officer Brett Hankison was indicted on three counts of wanton endangerment in the first degree for shooting into a neighboring apartment. What the heck is wanton endangerment? And just as importantly why is he facing five years in prison for shooting a wall but the officers who killed Taylor will not be charged with killing her?

Kentucky law describes wanton endangerment as happening:

“when, under circumstances manifesting extreme indifference to the value of human life, [a person] wantonly engages in conduct which creates a substantial danger of death or serious physical injury to another person.”

Allow this to sink in for a moment. Because this officer could have potentially caused bodily harm to someone in a neighboring apartment, he was the sole officer indicted from the night when Taylor was killed by police wearing civilian clothes using what was reported to be a no-knock warrant in the middle of the night. If this officer had actually shot straight, like his peers who killed Taylor, he would not have lost his job and would not be facing charges right now.

As we should have suspected, protests exploded in Louisville and around the country. I am numb. I have run out of words to describe my frustrations with America. I wonder why I stay in this country. I have been warning people for years that there is something fundamentally flawed with the way we police in this country.

It is more than the police though. It is also the district attorneys, and grand jurors around the country who refuse to hold police officers accountable for killing unarmed civilians. It is the state and federal elected officials, who have passed laws that make it nearly impossible to hold police officers accountable. It is the fault of judges who have interpreted the laws in a way that gives the cops a license to kill in almost every circumstance possible. It is the uncaring way in which so many Whites in this country show indifference when these things continue to happen over and over again.

The system is the problem not the people in the system. The system works the same in 2020 as it did in 1955 even though the people are not the same. he system is called racism. It allowed the murderers of Emmett Till to walk free and be paid for giving an interview with Look magazine where they detailed what they did to Emmett Till. On January 24, 1956 the magazine ran a cover story entitled “The Shocking Story of Approved Killing in Mississippi.” Both killers were paid $1,500 a piece and their attorney was paid $1,000. The most ironic thing about the magazine cover was that it featured two smiling blonde women who looked as if they did not have a care in this world.

Milam said during the interview that as they were kidnapping Till he pointed a flashlight in his face at his uncle’s home.

Milam: “You the nigger who did the talking?”

Bobo: “Yeah.”

Milam: “Don’t say, yeah to me. I’ll blow your head off. Get your clothes on.”

They stole a cotton gin fan weighing over 70 pounds so that they could weigh down Till’s corpse in the Tallahatchie River. This account comes from the interview:

They stood silently … just hating one another.

Milam: “Take off your clothes.”

Slowly, Bobo pulled off his shoes, his socks. He stood up, unbuttoned his shirt, dropped his pants, his shorts. He stood there naked. It was Sunday morning, a little before 7.

Milam: “You still as good as I am?”

Bobo: “Yeah.”

Milam: “You still ‘had’ white women?”

Bobo: “Yeah.”

That big .45 jumped in Big Milam’s hand. The youth turned to catch that big, expanding bullet at his right ear. He dropped.

This courageous 14-year-old kid had the audacity to speak to the White people in a way that was not allowed in Mississippi at that time. He was murdered and the murderers realizing they were protected by double jeopardy laws and a solidly White pool of jurors knew that nothing would happen to them. This is how Milam defended himself and described the murder in Look magazine.

“I never hurt a nigger in my life. I like niggers – in their place … But I just decided it was time a few people got put on notice. As long as I live and can do anything about it, niggers are gonna stay in their place. Niggers ain’t gonna vote where I live. If they did, they’d control the government. They ain’t gonna go to school with my kids. And when a nigger gets close to mentioning sex with a white woman, he’s tired o’ livin’. I’m likely to kill him. Me and my folks fought for this country, and we got some rights. I stood there in that shed and listened to that nigger throw that poison at me, and I just made up my mind. ‘Chicago boy,’ I said, ‘I’m tired of ’em sending your kind down here to stir up trouble. Goddam you, I’m going to make an example of you – just so everybody can know how me and my folks stand.’ So Big Milam decided to act. He needed a weight…Bobo wasn’t bleeding much. Pistol-whipping bruises more than it cuts. They ordered him back in the truck and headed west again … Bryant and Big Milam stood aside while Bobo loaded the fan. Weight: 74 pounds … Big Milam ordered Bobo to pick up the fan.He staggered under its weight … carried it to the river bank.

Till’s mother, Mamie Till, demanded that her son have an open casket funeral so that the world could see what they did to Bobo. According to PBS, “Emmett Till’s mutilated body would be on display for all to see. Fifty thousand people in Chicago saw Emmett Till’s corpse with their own eyes. When the magazine Jet ran photos of the body, Black Americans across the country shuddered.” The murder of Till was a catalyst for the community of Montgomery, Alabama standing up to segregation and boycotting the buses just a few months later.

The killing of Till, and the acquittal just weeks later was a heavy blow to the hearts and minds of the 15 million Black people in this country. Today, 44 million Black people were kicked in the stomach by this decision in Kentucky. Protests are occurring once again just as they were when George Floyd was killed by police in May. We have endured so many of these murders without receiving justice that it feels like we are in a never-ending, repeating cycle of doom. Justice does not allow itself to be a part of the lived experience of Blacks when they are killed by police and in many cases vigilantes.

We have done all of the things possible to tell America how we feel. America has not changed much since that hot summer day in Mississippi when two murderers walked away free men. The officers who killed Taylor will not be held accountable. Nothing will change this reality. Civil charges will not be filed. There may be talk of it happening but I would not bet on it occurring.

What can we do now? What have we not done already? Has it mattered that George Floyd’s death led to worldwide protests but here we are again just months later? How can we be comforted? How can we be expected to do anything other than express our emotions? Many won’t like the way some express their frustration over the coming days and weeks. We will hear the useless calls for more police training. We will hear people say they stand by us but don’t appreciate or support how we protest.

Unfortunately for Blacks in this country the more things change the more they stay the same. There are no words to describe the current feelings I have. I am not surprised by the decision to not charge the officers who killed Breonna Taylor. The mindset of those people in Mississippi back in the 1950s is the mindset of far too many people around the country today. We must be honest and call America out for allowing this systemic racism to perpetuate itself.

Bob Dylan’s song The Death of Emmett Till could easily be re-written on behalf of the memory of Breonna Taylor.

“And so this trial was a mockery, but nobody seemed to mind.

I saw the morning papers but I could not bear to see

The smiling brothers walkin’ down the courthouse stairs.

For the jury found them innocent and the brothers they went free,

While Emmett’s body floats the foam of a Jim Crow southern sea.

If you can’t speak out against this kind of thing, a crime that’s so unjust,

Your eyes are filled with dead men’s dirt, your mind is filled with dust.

Your arms and legs they must be in shackles and chains, and your blood it must refuse to flow,

For you let this human race fall down so God-awful low!

Death of Ginsburg could boost Trump,we have his Replacement Candidates

MEDIA ADVISORY

Death of Ginsburg could boost Trump,we have his Replacement Candidates

Democrats fear Donald Trump will defy the legal icon’s final wish and attempt to push through a candidate to the Supreme Court – diverting attention from his handling of the coronavirus crisis

Crowds have gathered to pay tributes to iconic Supreme Court judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg following her death at the age of 87.

Emotional tributes have been paid to the women’s rights champion, amid fears Donald Trump could defy her dying wish.

Ginsburg had pleaded for her successor to be appointed once there is a new President – but Trump seems likely to pounce on the chance to divert attention from his handling of the coronavirus.

If he gets his way and a conservative takes Ginsburg’s place, laws permitting abortion in the US could be under threat.

Flowers were left outside the Supreme Court building in Washington DC as mourners paid their respects.

Ginsburg was a renowned liberal who famously branded Trump a “faker” and said he was guided by his ego.

The judge, a co-founder of the Women’s Rights Project at the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), was just the second woman ever appointed to the Supreme Court, the highest court in the US.

She was popularly known by her initials RBG, and emerged as an icon in popular culture in recent years.

An image of Ginsburg and the alternating messages “thank you” and “rest in power” were projected on the front of the New York State Civil Supreme Court building in Manhattan as Americans paid tribute.

The race to appoint a successor

Ginsburg had requested that her replacement on the Supreme Court was not appointed until there is a new President.

Just days before her death, she dictated a statement to her granddaughter Clara Spera, saying: “My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed.”

Ruth Bader Ginsburg dies – and she didn’t want to be replaced until Trump out of office

But with Trump on the back foot and Republicans anxious about losing the White House and the US Senate, experts believe putting forward a candidate could divert criticism away from the incumbent.

If successful, it would also move the Supreme Court further to the right, giving it a 6-3 conservative majority.

The balance is currently 5-4 in favour of conservatives.

Trump has already appointed two conservatives to lifetime posts on the court, Neil Gorsuch in 2017 and Brett Kavanaugh in 2018.

Why this could impact on abortion rights in the US

Conservative activists for years have sought to get enough

votes on the Supreme Court to overturn the 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling that legalized abortion nationwide.

During the 2016 campaign, Trump promised to appoint justices who would overturn that landmark decision. 

If Trump is able to appoint a judge who opposes abortion, he may be able to deliver on this pledge.

Timing could suit Donald Trump’s campaign, says strategist

For months, the election contest has centred on Trump’s handling of the pandemic, which has badly damaged his prospects for reelection as the US death toll nears 200,000.

However, Ginsburg’s death opens up the potential for Trump or Biden to choose a successor – who could rule on issues including abortion access, environmental regulations and the power of the presidency for a generation.

Strategists on both sides have seized on the moment to find an advantage.

Trump’s supporters see an opportunity to galvanize support beyond his most loyal core of backers, with Republican strategist Alex Conant saying: “It’s hard to see how this doesn’t help Trump politically.

“Biden wants this election to be a referendum on Trump. Now it’s going to be a referendum on whoever he nominates to the supreme court.”

Multiple Republicans close to the White House believe Mr Trump will likely nominate a woman.

“Any week Donald Trump doesn’t have to talk about coronavirus is a net positive for him,” said Joel Payne, a Democratic strategist who worked for 2016 Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton.

“Historically, Republicans vote on the court. I think some Republicans will see this as the October surprise to gin up excitement in their base.”

Tributes paid to liberal icon

Figures from across the political spectrum have paid tribute to Ginsburg

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Democrat, posted on Twitter : “Tonight, the flags are flying at half staff over the Capitol to honor the patriotism of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

“Every woman and girl, and therefore every family, in America has benefitted from her brilliance.”

“Our Nation has lost a jurist of historic stature,” Chief Justice John Roberts said in a statement.

“We at the Supreme Court have lost a cherished colleague. Today we mourn, but with confidence that future generations will remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg as we knew her – a tireless and resolute champion of justice.”

“Today, our nation mourns the loss of a titan of the law,” Trump said in a statement, adding that Ginsburg’s decisions “have inspired all Americans, and generations of great legal minds.”

Trump, who as a presidential candidate in 2016 called on Ginsburg to resign and said “her mind is shot” after she criticized him in media interviews, did not mention any potential plans about nominating a replacement.

President Donald J. Trump announced the following additions to his Supreme Court List:

Bridget Bade is a Judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.  Prior to her appointment in 2019, Judge Bade was a United States Magistrate Judge for the District of Arizona and an Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Arizona.  Judge Bade served as a law clerk to Judge Edith H. Jones of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.  Judge Bade earned her B.A., summa cum laude, from Arizona State University and her J.D., cum laude, from Arizona State University’s Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law.

Daniel Cameron is the 51st Attorney General of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.  Before his election in 2019, Attorney General Cameron practiced law with Frost Brown Todd, LLC and served as Legal Counsel to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.  He served as a law clerk to Judge Gregory F. Van Tatenhove of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Kentucky.  Attorney General Cameron received his B.S. from the University of Louisville and his J.D., cum laude, from the University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law.

Tom Cotton is a United States Senator for the State of Arkansas.  Prior to his election in 2014, Senator Cotton served as a Member in the United States House of Representatives and in the United States Army, rising to the rank of Captain while serving in both Iraq with the 101st Airborne and in Afghanistan with a Provincial Reconstruction Team.  Prior to his military service, Senator Cotton practiced law at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, LLP.  Senator Cotton served as a law clerk to Judge Jerry Smith of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.  He received his A.B., magna cum laude, from Harvard College and his J.D. from Harvard Law School.

Paul Clement is a partner with Kirkland & Ellis, LLP.  He previously served as Solicitor General of the United States and has argued over 100 cases before the Supreme Court of the United States.  He served as a law clerk to Justice Antonin Scalia on the Supreme Court of the United States and Judge Laurence Silberman on the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.  Mr. Clement received his B.S.F.S., summa cum laude, from the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service; his M.Phil. from Cambridge University; and his J.D., magna cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

Ted Cruz is a United States Senator for the State of Texas.  Prior to his election in 2012, Senator Cruz was a partner at Morgan, Lewis & Bockius, LLP and served as Solicitor General of Texas.  Senator Cruz 

served as a law clerk to Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist on the Supreme Court of the United States and Judge J. Michael Luttig on the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit.  Senator Cruz received his A.B., cum laude, from Princeton University and his J.D., magna cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

Stuart Kyle Duncan is a Judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.  Before his appointment in 2018, he was a partner at Schaerr Duncan, LLP and General Counsel of the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty.  Earlier in his career, Judge Duncan served as Solicitor General of Louisiana.  Judge Duncan served as a law clerk to Judge John M. Duhé, Jr., of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.  He received his B.A., summa cum laude, from Louisiana State University; his J.D. from the Paul M. Hebert Law Center at Louisiana State University; and his LL.M. from Columbia University Law School.

Steven Engel is the Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Legal Counsel of the United States Department of Justice.  Prior to his appointment in 2017, Mr. Engel was a partner with Dechert, LLP and previously served in the Office of Legal Counsel as Deputy Assistant Attorney General.  Mr. Engel served as a law clerk to Justice Anthony Kennedy on the Supreme Court of the United States and to Judge Alex Kozinski on the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.  Mr. Engel earned his A.B., summa cum laude, from Harvard College; his M. Phil. from Cambridge University; and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

Noel Francisco is the former Solicitor General of the United States. Prior to his appointment in 2017, Mr. Francisco was a partner at Jones Day and served in the Office of Legal Counsel as Deputy Assistant Attorney General and as Associate Counsel to the President.  Mr. Francisco served as a law clerk to Justice Antonin Scalia on the Supreme Court of the United States and Judge J. Michael Luttig on the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit.  Mr. Francisco received his B.A., with honors, from the University of Chicago and his J.D., with high honors, from the University of Chicago Law School.

Josh Hawley is a United States Senator for the State of Missouri.  Prior to his election in 2018, Senator 

Hawley served as Attorney General of the State of Missouri, was an Associate Professor at the University of Missouri School of Law, and was an attorney with the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty.  Senator Hawley served as a law clerk to Chief Justice John Roberts on the Supreme Court of the United States and Judge Michael McConnell on the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit.  He received his B.A., with honors, from Stanford University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

James Ho is a Judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.  Prior to his appointment in 2018, Judge Ho was a partner at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, LLP and served as Solicitor General of Texas.  Judge Ho clerked for Justice Clarence Thomas on the Supreme Court of the United States and Judge Jerry Smith of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.  He received his B.A., with honors, from Stanford University and his J.D., with high honors, from the University of Chicago Law School.

Gregory Katsas is a Judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.  Prior to his appointment in 2017, Judge Katsas served as Deputy Assistant to the President and Deputy Counsel to the President.  He was previously a partner at Jones Day and served in senior positions in the United States Department of Justice, including as Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division and Acting Associate Attorney General.  Judge Katsas served as a law clerk to Justice Clarence Thomas, both at the Supreme Court of the United and the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, and to Judge Edward Becker of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit.  Judge Katsas earned his A.B.,cum laude, from Princeton University and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

Barbara Lagoa is a Judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit.  Before her appointment in 2019, Judge Lagoa was a Justice on the Supreme Court of Florida.  She also served as District Judge on the Florida Third District Court of Appeal and as an Assistant United States Attorney for the Southern District of Florida.  Judge Lagoa earned her B.A., cum laude, from Florida International University and her J.D. from Columbia Law School.

JudicialTyrannyChristopher Landau is the Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to the United Mexican States.  Prior to his appointment in 2019, Ambassador Landau was a partner with Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, LLP and, before that, headed the Appellate Litigation Practice Group at Kirkland & Ellis, LLP.  Ambassador Landau served as a law clerk to Justice Clarence Thomas, both on the Supreme Court of the United States and the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, and to Justice Antonin Scalia on the Supreme Court of the United States.  He received his A.B., summa cum laude, from Harvard College and his J.D., magna cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

Carlos Muñiz is a Justice on the Supreme Court of Florida.  Prior to his appointment in 2019, Justice Muñiz served as General Counsel to the United States Department of Education and in various positions in the Florida State government, including as Deputy Attorney General and Chief of Staff to Attorney General Pam Bondi.  Justice Muñiz served as a law clerk to Judge Jose Cabranes on the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and to Judge Thomas Flannery on the United States District Court for the District of Columbia.  Justice Muñiz received his B.A., with high honors, from the University of Virginia and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

Martha Pacold is a Judge on the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois. Prior to her appointment in 2019, Judge Pacold served as both Deputy General Counsel of the Department of the Treasury.  Earlier in her career, Judge Pacold was a partner at Bartlit Beck Herman Palenchar & Scott, LLP and served as Counsel to the Attorney General at the United States Department of Justice.  Judge Pacold served as a law clerk to Justice Clarence Thomas on the Supreme Court of the United States, to Judge Jay Bybee of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, and to Judge A. Raymond Randolph of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.  Judge Pacold earned her B.A., with highest distinction, from Indiana University, and her J.D., with honors, from the University of Chicago Law School.

Peter Phipps is a Judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit.  Prior to his elevation in 2019, Judge Phipps served as United States District Judge for the Western District of Pennsylvania.  Before taking the bench, Judge Phipps served as Senior Trial Counsel in the Federal Programs Branch of the Civil Division at the United States Department of Justice.  Judge Phipps served as a law clerk to Judge R. Guy Cole, Jr., of the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit.  He earned both his B.S. and his B.A., summa cum laude, from the University of Dayton and his J.D. from Stanford Law School.

Sarah Pitlyk is a Judge on the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri. Prior to her appointment in 2019, Judge Pitlyk was Special Counsel at the Thomas More Society and in private practice at Clark & Sauer, LLC.  Ms. Pitlyk served as a law clerk to then-Judge Brett Kavanaugh of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.  She received her B.A., summa cum laude, from Boston College; her M.A.’s from Georgetown University and the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven in Belgium; and her J.D. from Yale Law School.

Allison Jones Rushing is a Judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit.  Prior to her appointment in 2019, Judge Rushing was a partner at Williams & Connolly, LLP.  Judge Rushing clerked for Justice Clarence Thomas on the Supreme Court of the United States, Judge David Sentelle on the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, and then-Judge Neil Gorsuch on the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit.  Judge Rushing earned her B.A., summa cum laude, from Wake Forest University and her J.D., magna cum laude, from Duke University School of Law.

Kate Todd is Deputy Assistant to the President and Deputy Counsel to the President.  Before her appointment in 2019, she served as Senior Vice President and Chief Counsel of the United States Chamber Litigation Center and as a partner at what was previously Wiley Rein & Fielding, LLP.  Ms. Todd served as a law clerk to Justice Clarence Thomas of the Supreme Court of the United States and Judge J. Michael Luttig of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit.  Ms. Todd earned her B.A., with distinction, from Cornell University and her J.D., magna cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

Lawrence VanDyke is a Judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.  Prior to his appointment earlier this year, Judge VanDyke served as Deputy Assistant Attorney General for the Environment and Natural Resources Division of the United States Department of Justice.  Earlier in his career, Judge VanDyke served as both Solicitor General of Nevada and Solicitor General of Montana.  Judge VanDyke served as a law clerk to Judge Janice Rogers Brown of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.  He earned his B.S., with highest honors, from Montana State University; his B.Th., summa cum laude, from Bear Valley Bible Institute; and his J.D., magna cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

Respectfully,

Abdul-Jalil

ALL Matters on THIS WEBSITE ARE TRUE AND FACTUAL

 

MEDIA ADVISORY

ALL STATEMENTS CONTAINED IN THE POSTS ON THIS WEBSITE ARE TRUE AND FACTUAL AND HAVE BEEN SUBMITTED IN LEGAL FILINGS WITH THE COURTS MENTIONED HEREIN AND ARE TAKEN DIRECTLY FROM all records of any court, pleadings and papers on file with these facts and evidence, along with the admissions of testimony in the referenced actions: 

Alameda County Superior Court: al-Hakim v. EBMUD Alameda County Superior Court Case No. RG14740943 including al-Hakim’s Opposition Order to Show Cause and Challenges for Cause of Judges Robert Freedman, Stephen Kaus, and Evelio Grillo; Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim vs. AT&T Corporation, Alameda County Superior Court Case No.:RG17881130 and Challenges for Cause of Judges Stephen Kaus, and Evelio Grillo; al-Hakim v. Interserver Equinix, Alameda County Superior Court Case No.:RG18888371; Green Key vs. al-Hakim, Alameda County Superior Court Case No.:RG18927213; IN RE: al-Hakim, Alameda County Superior Court Case No.:RGl8919445; Miller vs al-Hakim, Alameda County Superior Court Case No.:OCV0574030; al-Hakim v. California State Automobile Association Inter-Insurance Bureau, Case No. 2001035356, Al-Hakim v. Pacific Bell Telephone Services. Case No. 2002047320, al-Hakim v. Oakland Imported Cars, Case No. RG03079876; al-Hakim v. Zeager, Case No. RG 1157820; Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim vs. Superior Court of Alameda County, On Appeal of Judicial Council Assignment Nos: 1050144-17 and 1054400-18; Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim v. California State

Automobile Association Inter-Insurance Bureau. et al., Alameda County Superior Court Case No. 811337-3, and Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim v. Rescue Industries, Alameda County Superior Court Case No. 821885-2 where the hostile intervener CSAA; Alameda County Family Court Case No. 511339-2 and 511488-1; Alameda County Department of Child Support Services(ACDCSS) case number #0010274454-01(previously listed as FSD #274454A; Alameda County Family Court Case No. C-556643; Alameda County Department of Child Support Services(ACDCSS) Case# 00100044308-01) (previously listed as FSD # 044308A;  Alameda County Traffic Court Case No. 51109206; State of California  Court of Appeals: Case No. A 118042; Appeals Court case numbers A101832, A108728, A112089 A-119006, A116369, A116222, A112691, A154128, A153640, A156308, A156462, A156677, A153510, A156616, A154159, A156583, A155447, A156052, A090346, A144040, A120556, A122756, A123340 and A111712; with ALL their Superior Court pleadings and papers on file in the Appeals Court

JudicialTyrannyin these referenced Appeals actions, including but limited to the Appellate Motions for Reconsideration, to Augment the Record on Appeal, to Unseal the Complete Transcript, to Dismiss the Appeal on Challenge for Cause, Appellant’s Petitions for Review filed January 3, 2006, and February 10, 2006 and all related papers filed by Defendant in the Court of Appeals with these facts and evidence, along with the admissions of testimony and applicable law cited by then defendant/appellant; and all related papers filed in Alameda County Superior Court with ALL the Challenges for Cause and Statements of Disqualification for ANY AND ALL JUGDES OR COMMISSIONERS, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, Judges Stephen Kaus, Evelio Grillo, Ioana Petrou, C. Don Clay, Wynne Carvil, Paul Herbert, James Richman, Kimberly Colwell, Jennifer Madden, Winifred Smith, Henry Needham, Judith Ford, Frank Roesch, Jon Tigar, Robert Freedman, and Commissioner Boydine Hall listed herein filed by appellant, the Answers filed by those Judges/Commissioner and the Reply to their Answers including on July 29, 2005 and August 29, 2005; those filed with the Motion to Appoint a Discovery Referee as ordered on January 17, 2002; those filed September 8, 2005 with Motion for Injunction and Protective Order Disqualifying Tim Schmal, those filed with Motion to Vacate heard on February 27, 2003, those filed on October 26, 2005 with Motion to Vacate, those filed on June 17, 2005, July 13, 2005 and August 25, 2005 with Motion for Stay, those filed with defendants Motion for Summary Judgment and to Dismiss heard on January 3, 2003 and August 24, 2004, those filed with defendant’s Motion to Dismiss on December 20, 2005; and all pleadings and papers on file in the State of California Supreme Court including but limited to referenced actions, Case Nos. S130203, S138090, S247169, S247972, S148288, S141119, S149744 and S140264; and United States Federal District Court- Northern Division cases: Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim v. Alameda County Superior Court, Judge Kim Colwell, Case: #18-cv-04408-DMR, also Judge Edward M. Chen, Case No.18-cv-04408-EMC; Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim v. Green Key Investments L.L.C., Case: #C19-0303 JSC; United States Federal Trustee, Northern District Of California; United States Federal Bankruptcy Court, Northern District of California, Kailey and Susan Wong, Case number #9542893; Stanley K. Burrell (M. C. Hammer) Case number #96-42564-NR;

Respectfully,

Abdul-Jalil

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